How ten years and more hard work is the basis for overnight success!

Have just heard from a chap I’ve known on and off for oh, a couple of decades, friend of family friends kindathing. He’s long wanted to be a writer. He’s written a few things I’ve seen and commented on – very overwritten, as I recall, but that’s nothing surprising in a writer’s development. We’ve all been there.

But an awful lot of would-be writers stop there, because they’re convinced what they’re writing is perfect. These days they go down the self-publishing route, convinced that ‘traditional publishing’ is biased against their genius or some such.

Not this guy. That last piece of his that I saw? He tells me “sent the book to an editor, got torn to shreds, learnt from my mistakes, moved on. . .”

He’s written plays to improve his dialogue – and had them published and performed. He’s sent out spec film scripts and got useful feedback from Hollywood. He’s been all through the cycle of agents’ letters saying ‘thanks for the novel, no, it’s not for us, but here’s a good deal of relevant feedback’.

Now he’s written The Novel that’s been picked up by a highly reputable agency, who offered it to some excellent publishers who ended up in a bidding war and a multiple book deal for very respectable money has resulted.

This really is splendid news to start a Monday, as far as I am concerned πŸ™‚

And yet another instance of that arcane and mystical secret to publishing success – persevere and write a good book!

I’ll share more info as and when things go public.

2 comments

  1. Thanks for this great story – It’s damned hard work to become an ‘overnight success’.
    I’m self-publishing because I know my market is limited, and they’re people easier for me to get too.

    1. Good luck to you! There is definitely a place for self-publishing; there always has been, especially for niche markets and specialised interests. It’s the notion that it’s somehow an easy short-cut route to mass-market success that’s the dubious bit… I’ve yet to see such a story that isn’t newsworthy in the same way as ‘man bites dog’ – in other words, it’s so unexpected and against the normal run of everyday experience.

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